Winter Series Part 2-Interview with Meagan Wilson from Whole Family Rhythms

SN Winter Series Part 2 with Meagan Wilson

  • This month’s giveaway: Beautiful mommy and me beanies by Emily tabor at www.emilytibor.com

  • Whole Family Rhythms with Meagan Wilson, Instagram: wholefamilyrhythms, click HERE for her website!

  • A Special link for TNMS mamas HERE!!

  • Your first is always your first, so, basically they’re always the guinea pig because they take you through each new season for the first time.

  • Why did Meagan choose Waldorf as an educational philosophy? She was drawn to how much it emphasizes learning through play. It’s also developmentally appropriate, so they learn based on where they are in that season of their life. 

  • Winter Play for early childhood (birth to age 7): lot’s of free self directed play. Free play is the exhale, and directed activity by an adult is the inhale. Children need both. When you’re indoors for the winter try creative play like baking and art. Link to meal planner pre-sell for ideas for recipes to do with your kiddos. Lot’s of sensory play too! Link to sensory bins in the freebies.

  • You can also bundle up your littles and take them on shorter nature walks when weather permits, even when it’s still a bit cold and snowy. 

  • In this season don’t forget the caregivers needs as well! 

  • Build rhythms and routines in line with your values while they’re young. 

  • Pick one day a week to go explore nature outside of your neighborhood. 

  • Being outside benefits everyone, children and care givers alike. 

  • Children learn through imitation, be worthy of imitation. 

  • Let your children see you as a person who is more than a mom. 

  • Keep built in moments everyday where you are bonding with your children and making memories. It relieves you of the pressure to spend every waking moment connecting with them. 

  • The big S word: Screen-time

  • Why limit screen time? There are tons of statistics that have shown that kids thrive more at a young age with less screen time. But most importantly, watch your children and see if there is a visible difference in them when they are watching vs. when they are not watching. 

  • Ask yourself why you turn on the screen and be intentional about it. If you allow it consider having it on at the same time for a limited time every day. This will create predictability for the family and it won’t be a crutch but an integrated part of the day instead. 

  • Educate yourself on what you allow your kids to watch, especially as they get older. 

  • Instead of screen time in the afternoon when you are exhausted, pull out sensory play. (Homemade play-dough, dried beans with cups and spoons, sensory bins)

  • Sparkle Stories app for kids 3-4 years old: Audio stories as an alternative to screen time for older littles.