Winter Series Part 3: All things PPD with Sarah Lavonne

Sarah Lavonne 

  • Find Sarah at Bundle Birth, and check out her YouTube channel!

  • Perenatal mood and anxiety disorders 

  • Postpartum is different than postpartum depression. Postpartum is the first 6 weeks after you have a baby. Postpartum depression is depression in the postpartum period that lasts after the first 2 weeks for however long. 

  • Baby Blues is feeling down and overwhelmed in the first 2 weeks and then adjusting in a way that doesn’t feel like you’re incapacitated. This is so typical and even to be expected in a lot of scenarios. 

  • Postpartum psychosis is very rare and not a result of postpartum depression. 


  • Signs of PPD: after the first 2 weeks there is a lot of tearfulness, insomnia, hopeless about the future, doing daily life feels really difficult, being afraid of the baby, walking away from a crying baby out of overwhelm. 

  • It’s not your fault. It’s no one’s fault. It’s good to talk about what you’re feeling. And if working with a doctor while being medicated works for you, that’s awesome. 

  • Mom-Shaming doesn’t fix anything. 

  • When you’re tempted to shame another mom, acknowledge that you are insecure and then deal with your insecurity instead of looking down on another mom. 

  • Create your “bubble of peace” by steering clear of influences that will harm your mental health. 

  • Give disclaimers before giving people advice or suggestions. 

  • You are your baby’s mom and you have instincts. You can follow your intuition and educate yourself even if your friends disagree with the outcome. 

  • Give yourself the grace to recognize that you are doing your best to take care of your baby. The neighbors opinion does not matter when you are doing what’s best for your family. 

  • Coping with Postpartum depression: start with awareness of your past and what you’re struggling with currently.

  • Identify your symptoms and then reach out to someone to get help making a plan. Recognize the issue and then be proactive to call on support. 

  • It’s ok to ask for help. It really is, even though it may not FEEL like it’s ok, It IS.  

  • Prioritize self care. For real. This will help you manage depressive symptoms. 

  • Identify what feeds your soul. And make time for it in any capacity that is manageable. 

  • Prioritize your nutrition. 

  • Have conversations with your partner about what you need. 

  • Talk to someone before and after giving birth about how you feel about the transition you’re going through. 

  • Doing things alone is always harder. 

  • Carbs and sugar are related to anxiety. 

  • Nutrition matters. 

  • Vulnerability book by Brene Brown 

  • Vulnerability often breeds more vulnerability, and it deflates shame. But be vulnerable with healthy and loving women who you feel safe around. 

  • Take of yourself, Lean on your support, and take advantage of clinical resources. 

  • There are perenatal psychologists that specialize in dealing with issues around pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period. 

  • la leche league